Home Base tackles food insecurity for veterans

One of the problems veterans face is food insecurity. Since the pandemic, the risk of food insecurity has increased more for veterans than for non-military members. Home Base partners with local organizations to meet this challenge. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, working-age veterans have a 7.4% higher risk of food insecurity than non-veterans. “They’re coming in, they’re looking for pantry help, they’re looking for help putting food in the fridge in general,” said Marydith Tuitt, program manager at Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center. one of 10 centers across the country offers a full range of resources, including a food pantry for veterans “I give out gift cards, I do bags. So there’s a need. It’s always there, and we haven’t balanced it yet,” Tuitt said. Harvard Street is one of many important partners of Home Base. They also partner with Stop and Shop for food assistance to their veterans. The cause knocks home for Pete Putre, senior vice president of merchandising who is also a Navy veteran.”We are able to help. And we are happy to help and to have partners like Home Base give us access to these amazing local heroes and we want to make it p artie,” Putre said. This year, Stop and Shop will donate Thanksgiving turkeys and all the fixings for a number of veterans in need to give them the opportunity to cook a holiday meal for their family. went above and beyond,” said Jessica Covitz, Home Base Outreach and Peer Support Team Leader. can’t feed yourself, so you’re not really focused on your mental health care,” Covitz said. Other studies show that food insecurity was 22.5% higher among veterans with disabilities, and female veterans are more likely to be food insecure than male veterans.

One of the problems veterans face is food insecurity. Since the pandemic, the risk of food insecurity has increased more for veterans than for non-military members. Residence partners with local organizations to meet this challenge.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, working-age veterans have a 7.4% higher risk of food insecurity than non-veterans.

“They’re coming in, they’re looking for help with the pantry, they’re looking for help with putting food in the fridge in general,” said Marydith Tuitt, program manager of Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center.

One of 10 centers nationwide offers a full range of resources, including a veterans pantry.

“I give out gift cards, I make bags. So there is a need. It’s still there, and we haven’t balanced it yet,” Tuitt said.

Harvard Street is one of many important Home Base partners. They also partner with Stop and shop food aid for their veterans. The cause hits home for Pete Putre, senior vice president of merchandising who is also a Navy veteran.

“We are able to help. And we’re happy to help and to have partners like Home Base give us access to these amazing local heroes and we want to be a part of that,” Putre said.

This year, Stop and Shop will donate Thanksgiving turkeys and all the trimmings to a number of veterans in need to give them the opportunity to cook a holiday meal for their family.

“We really wanted to be able to provide something for our veterans in need as the holidays approached, and I asked them for turkeys, and they went above and beyond,” said Jessica Covitz, team leader of home base veteran outreach and peer support.

Home Base reaches out to all veterans – inside and out – to help those most at risk, which makes this partnership even more important.

“If you can’t feed yourself, then you’re not really focused on your mental health care,” Covitz said.

Other studies show that food insecurity was 22.5% higher among veterans with disabilities, and female veterans are more likely to be food insecure than male veterans.

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