Offshore food – Offshores Nextdoor http://offshores-nextdoor.com/ Fri, 25 Nov 2022 08:38:24 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://offshores-nextdoor.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/profile.png Offshore food – Offshores Nextdoor http://offshores-nextdoor.com/ 32 32 Food insecurity in the Horn of Africa: 6-month outlook https://offshores-nextdoor.com/food-insecurity-in-the-horn-of-africa-6-month-outlook/ Fri, 25 Nov 2022 07:01:16 +0000 https://offshores-nextdoor.com/food-insecurity-in-the-horn-of-africa-6-month-outlook/ The Horn of Africa includes the poorest and most violent places in the world. In recent years, drought and famine have exacerbated these problems. Somalia faces the double threat of drought and crop failure. Responsible factors include climate change, terrorism and weak government institutions. World food prices have soared due to the war in Ukraine, […]]]>

The Horn of Africa includes the poorest and most violent places in the world. In recent years, drought and famine have exacerbated these problems. Somalia faces the double threat of drought and crop failure. Responsible factors include climate change, terrorism and weak government institutions. World food prices have soared due to the war in Ukraine, which has only made the situation worse. In this disastrous mix, terrorist groups thrive on the backs of chaos and discord.

KJ-1: It is very likely that the war in Ukraine will negatively affect food insecurity over the next 6 months.

  • Ukraine and Russia together supply nearly 25% of the world’s grain supply [source].
  • The outbreak of war in February resulted in a grain shortage. Food insecurity is particularly felt in the Horn of Africa [source].
  • The prevalence of Russian and Ukrainian warships and weapons in the Black Sea, as well as the seizure of major Ukrainian ports, have limited Ukraine’s ability to export grain [source].
  • Ukraine and Russia signed an agreement to ensure the safe passage of grain [source].
  • However, that deal fell apart when Ukraine hit Russian naval assets in Sevastopol with unmanned drones using the grain corridor as cover. [source].
  • Russia has periodically returned to the agreement under international pressure. Ukraine has not given explicit guarantees to limit strikes against the Crimean coastline [source].
  • Despite reduced activity, Russian naval assets continue to operate in the Black Sea, potentially sending civilian ships with unintended crossfire [source].
  • Russia has targeted 17 civilian and merchant navy vessels since the start of the war. Russian missiles hit bulk carrier Namura Queen in February [source].
  • Nevertheless, the first Ukrainian grain shipments to the Horn of Africa since February arrived in August [source].
  • 40% of Africa and the Middle East’s grain supply comes from Ukraine and Russia [source].
  • Research estimates that more than 20 million tons of grain have yet to be exported from Ukraine [source].

KJ-2: Extremist terrorist groups are likely to exploit food insecure populations over the next 6 months.

  • 7 million people in Somalia are in dire need of food. Most of the country is under some degree of food stress [source].
  • Al Shabaab deliberately interrupts the delivery of food aid to areas under their control. The majority of rural communities in Somalia are under the direct control of al-Shabaab [source].
  • Al-Shabaab restricts Western food deliveries to limit Western influence on populations under their rule [source].
  • Group alleges Western food aid provides cover for Western spy and intelligence agencies [source].
  • Food aid provided under the authority of the federal government weakens al-Shabaab’s political influence in areas under their control [source].
  • Food agencies are forced to use armed escorts for food delivery. As a result, they operate within a 30 minute window for deliveries. Al-Shabaab uses improvised explosive devices to target Western food convoys [source].
  • In 2011, al-Shabaab used food insecurity in the Horn of Africa to exert political influence over local populations [source].
  • To monopolize the food delivery network, the group torched aid delivery vehicles and murdered aid workers [source].
  • In 2017, al-Shabaab changed tactics. He built canals for villages affected by drought and set up local committees to manage the water supply for agriculture. [source].
  • Since 2017, propaganda sources linked to al-Shabaab have focused heavily on their efforts to alleviate food shortages [source].
  • Al-Shabaab uses its radio propaganda efforts to appeal to wealthy people to donate to address food shortages and fund their aid operations [source].

KJ-3: China is likely to play an increased role in addressing food insecurity over the next 6 months.

  • As part of President Xi’s broader Belt and Road Initiative, the Maritime Silk Road has established trade networks across the Indian Ocean [source].
  • In 2017, China began using the Maritime Silk Road network to deliver over 2,800 tons of rice to Somalia. [source].
  • China announced a food aid program in February this year during a bilateral meeting with Somalia. China plays greater role in tackling food insecurity in Africa [source].
  • Beijing appoints new special envoy for the Horn of Africa [source].
  • China pledges over $37 million in food aid to World Food Program [source].
  • Somalia, Ethiopia, Eritrea and Djibouti will receive the bulk of Chinese food aid [source].
  • Chinese food deliveries finally arrived in July [source].
  • China is partly responsible for the rise in food prices in the Horn of Africa. Fertilizer export controls and limits on grain shipments have compounded the effects of the war in Ukraine on world markets [source].
  • China, US engage in rhetorical exchange over how much food aid each country provides [source].
  • In a reflection of this dispute, the head of the US Agency for International Development, Samantha Powers, visited Kenya to show US aid commitments to the Horn of Africa. [source].

Deadline for information: November 25, 2022

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Scoular shines a light on sustainability success https://offshores-nextdoor.com/scoular-shines-a-light-on-sustainability-success/ Wed, 23 Nov 2022 15:50:00 +0000 https://offshores-nextdoor.com/scoular-shines-a-light-on-sustainability-success/ OMAHA, NEB. — Scoular released its second annual sustainability report on November 22, sharing progress in reducing its carbon footprint and protecting ecosystems through responsible marine sourcing. “As we moved from the early stages of our sustainability strategy into year two, we learned a tremendous amount on our path to success, while fostering new partnerships […]]]>

OMAHA, NEB. — Scoular released its second annual sustainability report on November 22, sharing progress in reducing its carbon footprint and protecting ecosystems through responsible marine sourcing.

“As we moved from the early stages of our sustainability strategy into year two, we learned a tremendous amount on our path to success, while fostering new partnerships to achieve our sustainability goals,” said Megan Belcher, director of legal and external affairs at Scoular. . “We are excited to share our progress as we work with employees, customers and partners to benefit the entire supply chain.”

The report outlines Scoular’s progress from June 2021 to May 2022 on each of the company’s five sustainability pillars. In 2021, the company publicly launched its sustainability strategy and the commitments it aims to achieve by 2025. The new report cites numerous examples of progress for each of the five pillars, including:

  • Reduced carbon footprint: Scoular has worked to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by investing in processes, infrastructure and technology to reduce truck emissions. Truck unloading times and weighing/scaling times have decreased.
  • Foster responsible product sourcing: Scoular has created a new marine sustainability program that incentivizes fishmeal producers to implement long-term sustainability practices that go beyond standard certification requirements.
  • Maintain workplace health and safety: A new safety system was launched at Scoular to improve reporting practices and proactively identify and eliminate hazards. The company also saw a drop in the total number of reportable injury (TRC) cases.
  • Promoting Diversity and Inclusion: Scoular launched a third employee resource group, Scoular Ethnicities and People of Color, joining Scoular Women Influencing Culture and Scoular Proud Ally Network. The company also added a paid mental health day for all employees.
  • Engage in their communities: Each employee now has eight hours of paid volunteer time per year and is expanding volunteer opportunities with community parties and giving events at locations around the world. The company also developed a board member development program and increased the number of Scoular leaders in leadership positions on nonprofit boards.

“I am delighted with Scoular’s progress over the past year and look forward to the year ahead as we build on our strategies to operate with integrity and deliver safe, reliable supply chain solutions. and responsible,” said Paul Maass, CEO of Scoular.

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The Recorder – ‘All about giving’: Holiday food distributions kick into high gear https://offshores-nextdoor.com/the-recorder-all-about-giving-holiday-food-distributions-kick-into-high-gear/ Mon, 21 Nov 2022 23:15:48 +0000 https://offshores-nextdoor.com/the-recorder-all-about-giving-holiday-food-distributions-kick-into-high-gear/ At least 292 families will have a warmer Thanksgiving this year thanks to the donations and volunteer efforts of area individuals and businesses. The Thomas Memorial Golf & Country Club in Turners Falls partnered with the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office TRIAD program Monday morning to assemble 150 food boxes for those in need in Franklin […]]]>

At least 292 families will have a warmer Thanksgiving this year thanks to the donations and volunteer efforts of area individuals and businesses.

The Thomas Memorial Golf & Country Club in Turners Falls partnered with the Franklin County Sheriff’s Office TRIAD program Monday morning to assemble 150 food boxes for those in need in Franklin County. It came three days after local DJ Robert “Bobby C” Campbell hosted 120 turkey dinners in Bernardston, and Kennametal – a supplier of industrial tools and materials – worked with Franklin-area United Way & Hampshire to distribute 22 turkeys.

A few dozen volunteers gathered at the golf club to fill boxes with ingredients for Thanksgiving meals to pick up or deliver.

“We seem to be growing every year. I think the first year was 33 (boxes). We are at 150,” said organizer Chet Czernich, adding that 144 boxes were distributed last year. “It keeps increasing every year.”

Each box contained a turkey, potatoes, onions, celery, rolls, a can of peas, a can of corn, a can of cranberry sauce, squash, cream cheese, a mix of McCormick sauce and a Table Talk pie. Club members were concentrating on 75 boxes for the Salvation Army while people from TRIAD worked on getting meals to the elderly. Jim and Loretta Graves donated 300 pounds of onions, while Szawlowski Potato Farms in Hatfield donated the potatoes, and the 150 turkeys came from Market 32 ​​in Brattleboro, Vermont.

Czernich explained that he and his wife, Charlene, have been going to the Table Talk Pie Co. factory in Worcester for the past three years to pick up donations.

“They were going to give away 100 pies. And when we got there they donated all 150 pies,” he said.

Money for this donation business is generated through a golf tournament and raffle. Czernich mentioned that he came up with the idea because his class of 1964 from Ralph C. Mahar Regional School had done something similar.

Ray Zukowski, a TRIAD supervisor, said he was coordinating with local senior centers to find seniors who could use the help the most.

“There’s just a need there,” he said.

Campbell began her distribution with 12 volunteers Friday outside the Bernardston Senior Center donating 40 Thanksgiving meals to families involved with Big Brothers Big Sisters of Franklin County.

“Thanksgiving is about giving thanks and receiving thanks,” Campbell said.

Along with Big Brothers Big Sisters, he has donated to Stone Soup Cafe, Living Waters Assembly of God, Greenfield Salvation Army, United Arc, and Montague Catholic Social Ministries. With all the donations, he provided approximately 2,700 meals.

Orange resident Cyndi Clark arrived at Bernardston Senior Center to grab a meal for a friend.

“Bobby helps everyone,” Clark said as volunteers loaded a 15-pound turkey into his car.

“I just want to carry on the tradition I had growing up,” Debbie Smith said as she ate her meal for the 20 guests she plans to have this year. She explained that her husband had to quit his job due to a disability and they were still waiting for his disability check. Therefore, they didn’t have the money for a Thanksgiving dinner and are grateful they were able to take advantage of what Campbell offers.

Campbell explained that he needed to raise $1,500 for his 120 meal distribution this year, noting that inflation made it difficult to organize his fundraiser. The Bernardston Kiwanis Club, the Bernardston Veterans Organization, the Franklin County Knights of Columbus, and the Marine Corps League Oak Ridge Detachment helped Campbell reach his financial goal.

“Everyone should have a Thanksgiving dinner,” he said when asked why he continues to fundraise. This is the seventh year he has raised funds for turkey dinners. In his first year, he distributed 50 meals.

Bernardston’s Eric Boliski had a meal for his sister-in-law, who had a surprisingly difficult year due to the death of her husband. Boliski explained that Thanksgiving means “family” and that he is happy to celebrate with his family this year.

Further south, United Way distributed the 22 turkeys donated by Kennametal on Friday. Plant manager Joseph Sulda said he was buying turkeys for all of his employees and holding a food and diaper drive for United Way at the plant. He deposits all the collected food and all the extra turkeys.

Sulda noted that Kennametal employees donate about $5,000 to United Way each year.

“Given the current cost, many families are struggling,” he said. “We like to think we’re helping these families.”

Bella Levavi can be reached at:blevavi@recorder.com or 413-930-4579. Domenic Poli can be reached at dpoli@recorder.com or 413-930-4120.

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Wet dog food is worse for the environment than dry kibble, scientists say https://offshores-nextdoor.com/wet-dog-food-is-worse-for-the-environment-than-dry-kibble-scientists-say/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 16:25:36 +0000 https://offshores-nextdoor.com/wet-dog-food-is-worse-for-the-environment-than-dry-kibble-scientists-say/ Want to make your dog the next Pet-a Thunberg? Try replacing their wet food with dry kibble. A new study has found that feeding your dog wet food contributes almost seven times more carbon dioxide per year than dry food. Scientists from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil assessed the environmental impacts of commercially […]]]>

Want to make your dog the next Pet-a Thunberg? Try replacing their wet food with dry kibble.

A new study has found that feeding your dog wet food contributes almost seven times more carbon dioxide per year than dry food.

Scientists from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil assessed the environmental impacts of commercially available and homemade pet foods for dogs and cats.

They found that owners are able to make their pet’s diet more sustainable by switching to kibble and biscuits, without compromising nutritional value.

“Food production is responsible for nearly a quarter of environmental impact and therefore its importance to sustainability should not be overlooked,” the authors write.

“Wet diets, although indicated as a strategy to increase the palatability and water intake of cats and dogs at higher risk of developing urolithiasis, are those that have the greatest impact on the environment.”

Scientists from the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil assessed the environmental impacts of commercially available and homemade pet food for dogs and cats (stock image)

Estimated carbon dioxide equivalent emissions (left) and land use (right) per 1000 kcal of dog diets by diet type.  Cc: Homemade diets commercially available, Cs: Homemade diets prepared by the owner, S: Dry diets and U: Wet diets

Estimated carbon dioxide equivalent emissions (left) and land use (right) per 1000 kcal of dog diets by diet type. Cc: Homemade diets commercially available, Cs: Homemade diets prepared by the owner, S: Dry diets and U: Wet diets

Estimated sulfur dioxide (left) and phosphate (right) emissions per 1000 kcal of dog diets by diet type.  Sulfur dioxide can damage plants, while phosphates can lead to harmful algal blooms that disrupt marine ecosystems.  Cc: Homemade diets commercially available, Cs: Homemade diets prepared by the owner, S: Dry diets and U: Wet diets

Estimated sulfur dioxide (left) and phosphate (right) emissions per 1000 kcal of dog diets by diet type. Sulfur dioxide can damage plants, while phosphates can lead to harmful algal blooms that disrupt marine ecosystems. Cc: Homemade diets commercially available, Cs: Homemade diets prepared by the owner, S: Dry diets and U: Wet diets

WHY ARE INGREDIENTS OF ANIMAL ORIGIN HARMFUL FOR THE ENVIRONMENT?

Food products of animal origin harm the environment in different ways.

Cows, pigs and other farm animals release huge amounts of methane into the atmosphere, which is a greenhouse gas and contributes to global warming.

Raising livestock also means converting forests to agricultural land, which means that CO2-absorbing trees are cut down, further contributing to climate change.

Factory farms and growing crops also require huge amounts of water, with 542 liters of water used to produce a single chicken breast.

On top of that, nitrogen-based fertilizer used on crops adds to nitrous oxide emissions. Nitrous oxide is about 300 times more effective at trapping heat in the atmosphere. These fertilizers can also end up in rivers, contributing to pollution.

Keeping a pet dog or cat is hugely popular around the world, with around ten million dogs and 11 million cats in the UK alone, according to the charity PDSA.

In Brazil, where the study was based, there are around 52 million dogs, and the researchers wanted to find out how much of an impact their diet had on the environment.

They assessed the greenhouse gas emissions, land use and water use of ingredients in the diets of 618 dogs and 320 cats.

These included kibble and wet food from three Brazilian pet food retailers, as well as “homemade” products that were either made by companies or prepared at home by owners.

The nutritional value and calorie content of the different diets were also assessed for the study, published today in Scientific reports.

Researchers have found that wet dog and cat food diets have a higher overall impact on the environment than kibble or homemade diets.

They calculated that a 22-pound (10 kg) dog consuming an average of 534 calories per day from wet food would be responsible for 6,541 kg of carbon emissions per year.

For dry foods, however, they would provide only 828.37 kg of carbon dioxide, almost seven times less.

In terms of nutritional value, dry diets provided the highest number of calories per gram, although wet and homemade foods provided higher amounts of protein.

British Veterinary Association Senior Vice President Justine Shotton added: “There is no nutritional difference between wet and dry pet food.

“In some cases, a vet may recommend one over the other for specific reasons, such as urinary issues and specific types of allergies.

“The British Veterinary Association advises your vet to first make any changes to your pet’s normal diet to ensure they remain nutritionally balanced.”

In wet diets, researchers found that 89% of calories came from animal ingredients, such as poultry meal and fat, but that was only 45% in dry diets.

These animal sources likely contribute to its greater environmental impact and suggest replacing them with protein from insects, e.g. mealworms.

While a plant-based diet would also reduce environmental impact, dogs and cats are carnivores and have different nutritional needs than humans.

The article points out that feeding pets a vegan diet “could pose risks,” but adding synthetic amino acids is a potential solution.

In terms of nutritional value, dry diets provided the highest number of calories per gram, although wet and homemade foods provided higher amounts of protein (stock image)

In terms of nutritional value, dry diets provided the highest number of calories per gram, although wet and homemade foods provided higher amounts of protein (stock image)

However, in 2020 scientists discovered that the dry pet food industry needed land twice the size of the UK to make a sufficient supply.

It also produces 106 million tons of carbon dioxide per year, making the industry dirtier than the Philippines.

This suggests that while kibble is still a greener alternative to wet food, the environmental footprint of the industry as a whole is far from negligible.

In fact, pet food contributes about one-ninth of carbon dioxide every year, because the the aviation industry.

Dr Peter Alexander, co-author of this study from the University of Edinburgh, said: “This is a subject that has been previously overlooked, but we have shown that companion animals and the way they feed must be considered alongside other actions to reduce climate change and biodiversity loss.

Dogs on a raw food diet may shed antibiotic-resistant bacteria that could be passed to humans

Dogs fed raw meat are more likely to shed antibiotic resistant bacteria Escherichia coli (E. coli) in their feces, veterinarians have warned.

Previous research showed that it is also possible that E. Coli is transmitted from dogs to their human owners through normal daily interaction.

Researchers from the University of Bristol suggest that pet owners who feed their dogs raw should take extra care when cleaning up their messes.

They also suggest that the fad diet is not the safest choice for a domestic dog for this reason.

Learn more here

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Sustainable Aquatic Food Systems for Climate Resilience – Food Reservoir https://offshores-nextdoor.com/sustainable-aquatic-food-systems-for-climate-resilience-food-reservoir/ Tue, 15 Nov 2022 01:32:33 +0000 https://offshores-nextdoor.com/sustainable-aquatic-food-systems-for-climate-resilience-food-reservoir/ At a recent session at the United Nations Climate Change Conference, government officials and sustainability advocates discussed the role of aquatic foods and water management in building more resilient communities and l mitigating the climate crisis. The conversation was organized by the Environmental Defense Fund and the Food Systems Pavilion. According to Dr Shakuntala Thilsted, […]]]>

At a recent session at the United Nations Climate Change Conference, government officials and sustainability advocates discussed the role of aquatic foods and water management in building more resilient communities and l mitigating the climate crisis. The conversation was organized by the Environmental Defense Fund and the Food Systems Pavilion.

According to Dr Shakuntala Thilsted, winner of the 2021 World Food Prize and Aquatic Food System Champion, food system solutions “must move beyond land-based crops and livestock to underwater food,” she shared at the 2021 UN Food Systems Summit. “The potential for diverse aquatic foods and nutrients is ripe for the picking, providing a pathway to produce an adequate food supply without increasing carbon emissions while reducing ecosystem stress and habitat loss.”

Aquatic foods include marine and freshwater species that are wild harvested or farmed and cultivated, says Rose LaBrèche, manager of international oceans policy for Oceans Canada. Worldwide, 2,500 different species are caught or cultured for human consumption, including shellfish, plants and seaweed. These species support the livelihoods of more than 800 million people and provide protein to more than 3.2 billion people worldwide.

Globally, “millions of people live off the ocean and need the ocean to live,” says Martha Delgado Peralta, Undersecretary for Multilateral Affairs and Human Rights at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs from Mexico. It highlights the urgency of good ocean management, especially for ocean nations like Mexico.

A cross-sector group of over 30 members representing government, NGOs, academia, etc. launched the Aquatic Blue Foods Coalition in 2022. Its objective is to highlight the importance of aquatic foods and their role in solving the climate crisis and the fight against food insecurity.

Panelists argued that integrated water management is key to addressing the climate crisis and discussed the need to move away from a siled approach. “Water is the engine of change. Any extreme that has a negative impact on nature, on people, on society, on the economy, is driven by water, [from] drought, floods, water scarcity,” says Darko Manakovski, Global Development Manager for the Global Water Partnership. He adds that approaches to land management impact the global hydrological system, evaporation patterns, rainfall and food production.

“To break down this silo, we need to understand that water is a very local issue, and we need to invite local governments to the COP [COP]so that they show the problems that people are facing,” adds Delgado Peralta.

California is the Most productive agricultural state in the United States, but the state is also particularly vulnerable to water scarcity. “Climate changes everything in our water system,” says Karen Ross, secretary of the California Department of Food and Agriculture (CDFA). She says California’s ability to sustainably manage its aquifers and groundwater will determine its food production. Ross also points out that holistic climate models are important for understanding not only past water patterns, but also the impact of current and future water patterns on the California food system.

To better manage the world’s water supply, Manakovski says it’s crucial to understand the true value of water and move from viewing it as a public good to a commons, and treating water as a resource. collectively managed municipality. “It is important to share and use data to understand the impact of water availability on food security, irrigation and equity,” says Manakovski.

To achieve these goals, panelists emphasized that a diversity of stakeholders must have a voice, especially those who have been historically excluded, including women, youth and Indigenous peoples. “We’re facing volatility like we’ve never seen before,” Ross said. Addressing this issue “starts with thinking about people in the local community…and understanding[ing] who is not at the table to make better decisions.

The inclusion of fishers from different regions is also key to building the resilience of aquatic food systems. “If we really want to change the approach to sustainable development [water] management, it is mandatory to include not only the voices [of fishers], but to understand the significant needs of anglers around the world. And the needs are very different,” explains Delgado Peralta. For example, she says that NGOs in Mexico are working to help fishermen diversify their income with other types of activities. “It’s a mixture of different solutions that we have to come up with and start piloting with them,” she says.

And LaBrèche says finding ways to engage young people that are meaningful to them, such as through social media, can help involve them in decision-making processes.

“Young people need mentorship, they need support and they need inclusion,” says Delgado Peralta, explaining that young leaders have been trained to lead multinational negotiations. “We were better with their presence.”

Watch the full conversation below:

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Home Base tackles food insecurity for veterans https://offshores-nextdoor.com/home-base-tackles-food-insecurity-for-veterans/ Thu, 10 Nov 2022 22:04:00 +0000 https://offshores-nextdoor.com/home-base-tackles-food-insecurity-for-veterans/ One of the problems veterans face is food insecurity. Since the pandemic, the risk of food insecurity has increased more for veterans than for non-military members. Home Base partners with local organizations to meet this challenge. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, working-age veterans have a 7.4% higher risk of food insecurity than […]]]>

One of the problems veterans face is food insecurity. Since the pandemic, the risk of food insecurity has increased more for veterans than for non-military members. Home Base partners with local organizations to meet this challenge. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, working-age veterans have a 7.4% higher risk of food insecurity than non-veterans. “They’re coming in, they’re looking for pantry help, they’re looking for help putting food in the fridge in general,” said Marydith Tuitt, program manager at Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center. one of 10 centers across the country offers a full range of resources, including a food pantry for veterans “I give out gift cards, I do bags. So there’s a need. It’s always there, and we haven’t balanced it yet,” Tuitt said. Harvard Street is one of many important partners of Home Base. They also partner with Stop and Shop for food assistance to their veterans. The cause knocks home for Pete Putre, senior vice president of merchandising who is also a Navy veteran.”We are able to help. And we are happy to help and to have partners like Home Base give us access to these amazing local heroes and we want to make it p artie,” Putre said. This year, Stop and Shop will donate Thanksgiving turkeys and all the fixings for a number of veterans in need to give them the opportunity to cook a holiday meal for their family. went above and beyond,” said Jessica Covitz, Home Base Outreach and Peer Support Team Leader. can’t feed yourself, so you’re not really focused on your mental health care,” Covitz said. Other studies show that food insecurity was 22.5% higher among veterans with disabilities, and female veterans are more likely to be food insecure than male veterans.

One of the problems veterans face is food insecurity. Since the pandemic, the risk of food insecurity has increased more for veterans than for non-military members. Residence partners with local organizations to meet this challenge.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, working-age veterans have a 7.4% higher risk of food insecurity than non-veterans.

“They’re coming in, they’re looking for help with the pantry, they’re looking for help with putting food in the fridge in general,” said Marydith Tuitt, program manager of Harvard Street Neighborhood Health Center.

One of 10 centers nationwide offers a full range of resources, including a veterans pantry.

“I give out gift cards, I make bags. So there is a need. It’s still there, and we haven’t balanced it yet,” Tuitt said.

Harvard Street is one of many important Home Base partners. They also partner with Stop and shop food aid for their veterans. The cause hits home for Pete Putre, senior vice president of merchandising who is also a Navy veteran.

“We are able to help. And we’re happy to help and to have partners like Home Base give us access to these amazing local heroes and we want to be a part of that,” Putre said.

This year, Stop and Shop will donate Thanksgiving turkeys and all the trimmings to a number of veterans in need to give them the opportunity to cook a holiday meal for their family.

“We really wanted to be able to provide something for our veterans in need as the holidays approached, and I asked them for turkeys, and they went above and beyond,” said Jessica Covitz, team leader of home base veteran outreach and peer support.

Home Base reaches out to all veterans – inside and out – to help those most at risk, which makes this partnership even more important.

“If you can’t feed yourself, then you’re not really focused on your mental health care,” Covitz said.

Other studies show that food insecurity was 22.5% higher among veterans with disabilities, and female veterans are more likely to be food insecure than male veterans.

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Food cooperatives are a better alternative to corporate grocers https://offshores-nextdoor.com/food-cooperatives-are-a-better-alternative-to-corporate-grocers/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 09:11:00 +0000 https://offshores-nextdoor.com/food-cooperatives-are-a-better-alternative-to-corporate-grocers/ The recent news that Kroger, owner of Mariano’s, is planning to acquire Albertsons, owner of Jewel, is the latest in a decades-long trend of grocery industry consolidation. Business leaders say consolidation produces cost savings for consumers. Whether this is ultimately confirmed, there are obvious concerns that access to our grocery store is being controlled by […]]]>

The recent news that Kroger, owner of Mariano’s, is planning to acquire Albertsons, owner of Jewel, is the latest in a decades-long trend of grocery industry consolidation. Business leaders say consolidation produces cost savings for consumers. Whether this is ultimately confirmed, there are obvious concerns that access to our grocery store is being controlled by increasingly larger and fewer entities.

For starters, less diverse supply chains mean bigger problems when disruptions inevitably occur. Local farmers and producers find it harder to get produce to customers, which can force them out of business. Shops in popular neighborhoods may close without notice.

As consumers, we have fewer choices, and corporate grocers may not reflect our values ​​in areas such as sustainability and labor practices.

SEND LETTERS TO: letters@suntimes.com. We want to hear from our readers. To be considered for publication, letters must include your full name, neighborhood or hometown, and a phone number for verification purposes. Letters should be a maximum of 375 words. See our guidelines.

Fortunately, there is an alternative to the growing consolidation of grocery stores: food cooperatives.

Food cooperatives are owned by communities and neighborhoods. They are democratically run businesses – one owner, one vote – and cannot be bought or acquired without majority consent. Co-ops elect boards of directors that set corporate priorities and policies.

Food cooperatives allow more of our grocery dollars to circulate locally instead of being extracted from communities; for example, the percentage of income co-ops spend on charitable causes is three times that of conventional stores, and food co-ops spend an average of 38% of their income on local expenses.

Food cooperatives are on the rise in Chicagoland. Chicago Market, a co-op grocery store opening in 2023 in Uptown, is one of an exciting number of community-driven, community-driven startup grocery co-ops (including Wild Onion Market in Rogers Park, Southside Food Co-Op on the South Side and Prairie Food Co-op in Lombard). Dill Pickle in Logan Square and Sugar Beet in Oak Park have been regional food co-ops for several years.

Through food co-ops, we can own and control grocery options that reflect our values; foster strong and diverse regional food systems; and invest our food dollars locally. We generally have little to say about corporate grocery store consolidation trends.

We don’t have to cede our destiny to absentee investors or wealthy elites. We can create alternatives that create shared prosperity with decisions made by those most directly affected. Local food cooperatives seem to me to be such an alternative, through which we could decide – as neighbors and stakeholders – to grow together.

Dan Arnett, Managing Director, Chicago Market

The City must do more to help the homeless

When was the last time your commute took you down Marine Drive? If this was last year, you probably noticed an abundance of tents along the way. From Irving Park Road north to Foster Avenue, tents popped up like a campground. The pandemic and rising rents have caused the number of homeless people to skyrocket.

The city is not doing enough to help provide proper housing for people in need. Winter is coming, and many have only the shelter of a tent. Mayor Lori Lightfoot allocated $10 million for housing in the 2023 budget. That’s not enough to house the homeless and doesn’t create a revenue stream to support transitional housing expenses.

One solution is to follow the lead of the grassroots organization, Bring Chicago Home, which proposed an increase in the Real Estate Transfer Tax (RETT) on homes valued over $1 million, which would result in by an annual flow of income. This additional tax money could be used to maintain transitional housing while building more affordable housing for those in desperate need.

Heather Fink, Downtown

The AIDS garden offers a history lesson to all

I finally visited the AIDS garden at the Belmont Rocks site. As I rode a Divvy bike, I noticed the little signs with QR codes along the walkways. Listening to the diversity of stories they brought to life gave me an intense array of emotions, including pride, grief and hope.

As a young gay man who’s only been in this town a few years, it’s easy to overlook or overlook stories that weren’t thrown at me in school or have no immediacy in my daily life. I am so grateful to those who made this space possible, those who tell these important stories and those who are not there to tell their stories, but who bravely and authentically lived to make this city the refuge it is for me today.

Preserving and sharing underappreciated stories is vital and life-saving, so I hope you’ll engage with the stories at www.aidsgardenchicago.org, even though an in-person lakeside visit is booked for next spring.

Gus Haffner, lake view

Educating the Aging Young Generation

Young people should know that the monthly social security check that older people receive is based on the social security payment. When a person fails to meet their quarterly payment responsibility, the monthly amount is significantly reduced. People may think they automatically get $1,500 a month at age 62, but that’s not true.

A lot of people think working for money under the table is awesome, until they find out they’re only getting about $500 a month if they haven’t paid taxes for all the periods. A social security education course should be taught to all high school students so that they understand social security and medicare for their own future.

Mike Zaczek, Orland Park

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What will it take to grow food on Mars? https://offshores-nextdoor.com/what-will-it-take-to-grow-food-on-mars/ Thu, 03 Nov 2022 17:37:30 +0000 https://offshores-nextdoor.com/what-will-it-take-to-grow-food-on-mars/ From a science fiction novel to a research reality, Anca Delgado says his new project could change the course of space exploration by human astronauts. Delgado, assistant professor of environmental engineering at School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, part of the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University, recently earned […]]]>

From a science fiction novel to a research reality, Anca Delgado says his new project could change the course of space exploration by human astronauts.

Delgado, assistant professor of environmental engineering at School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, part of the Ira A. Fulton Schools of Engineering at Arizona State University, recently earned a Emerging frontiers of research and innovationor EFRI grant from national science foundation with co-funding from Nasa. The project seeks to address a critical aspect of travel to distant planets: a sustainable food source.

Anca Delgado graduated from ASU with her doctorate in microbiology. After spending time as a postdoctoral research associate, she became an assistant professor in 2017. Photographer: Monica Williams/ASU

With travel to Mars becoming a possibility over the next decade or two, Delgado says his attention has turned to a major problem facing scientists.

“The soil-like material currently on Mars contains a chemical called perchlorate, which on Earth is a contaminant,” says Delgado, who also holds a professorship in the Swette Center for Environmental Biotechnology in ASUs Biodesign Institute. “The concentration of perchlorate in the soils of Mars is of a higher magnitude than anywhere on Earth. Thus, this chemical can have a substantial negative effect on human health if food is grown and consumed there.

With a background in transforming carbon and chlorine compounds in water and soil using microbial processes, Delgado began to look at the challenges on Mars in a new light. Perchlorate salts that are toxic to humans are chlorine compounds. So, could a technique she had been studying for years be applied in the same way?

“On Earth, microorganisms have no problem taking perchlorate and using it to grow their metabolism and get energy,” Delgado says. “They do what’s called a respiratory reaction that leads to perchlorate sanitization because microorganisms convert that perchlorate into non-toxic byproducts.”

In the case of Mars soil remediation, she says microorganisms would use perchlorate as a resource, producing water and chloride from it. Compared to other food-growing operations, the bioremediation process being tested does not require additional resources that are scarce on Mars or would be a burden to transport there.

“There is always the option of growing food crops hydroponically. But with a significant distance to Mars and the lack of readily available water, we need a different kind of plan,” says Delgado. “If it is possible to grow plants directly in the ground, there are advantages in terms of water use and resources to supply Mars.”

A multi-step process

To begin, Delgado and his team of researchers will work to create a material that replicates the ground cover on the surface of Mars, known as Mars regolith. The entire remediation process will be carried out in a controlled environment similar to a greenhouse. This will allow researchers to control where microorganisms are introduced and track the exit of their byproducts without leaving a lasting effect on Mars’ environment.

“For laboratory testing, there are Martian regolith simulants, which are essentially soil-like inorganic materials with similar mineralogical compositions to those that rovers have detected on Mars,” she says. “We will then add the perchlorate salts to simulate this chemical composition as well.”

Microorganisms will then be added to the Martian regolith simulant to produce the chlorine and water by-products, counteracting the addition of the perchlorates. At this point, Delgado says, the microbial biomass or organic matter of the bacteria that removed the perchlorate will also be left behind — an important step in delivering organic carbon to the soil and a requirement for seed germination.

“This process is the most critical step in research,” she says. “We will test plant growth in regolith simulants where microorganisms have completely or partially removed perchlorate concentrations, and refine the process to convert regolith to plant soil.”

A team of experts

Anca Delgado and student in the laboratory

The project will use a Martian regolith simulant and then perchlorate salts will be added to replicate the chemical composition of flooring found on Mars. Photographer: Monica Williams/ASU

In partnership with Delgado, a team of interdisciplinary researchers from across the country. They understand Andrew Palm, associate professor of ocean engineering and marine science at the Florida Institute of Technology. After the Martian regolith simulant is bioremediated by Delgado’s lab, the soil will be shipped to Palmer’s team to begin the seed germination process, growing a variety of commonly eaten plants.

“The best soils for agriculture on Earth were harvested decades ago, so now we’re trying to cultivate new lands that aren’t really meant for agriculture,” Palmer says. “So while this research focuses specifically on Mars, it has the ability to teach and inspire new farming techniques right here at home.”

Throughout the process, soil samples will also be collected and sent to Tucson, Arizona, where Malak Tfailyassociate professor of environmental science at the University of Arizona, will perform a series of tests to determine if the microorganisms were effective in removing perchlorate and producing soil organic carbon.

“Growing crops on Mars is a difficult task and cannot be done alone. It takes a group of interdisciplinary scientists to address these global and social challenges,” says Tfaily. “Given that the main objective of this project is to grow crops on Mars, we need to understand in depth the organic matter-microbe-plant interactions as well as the social and economic implications of this. Therefore, having expertise in multiple disciplines will allow us to ensure that we are asking the right questions.”

The team also includes Timiebi Aganaba, assistant professor of space and society at the School for the Future of Innovation in Society at ASU with a background in space law and emerging borders.

“As someone who started my career in the space program of a developing country, the question I had to answer every day was, ‘When people are starving, have no electricity or water, why should we do we care about space?”, says Aganaba. “With this NSF project, I finally have a very tangible answer because it is clear that there is a link between the concept of food security and space exploration. “

In this case, interest in growing food in the extreme environments of Mars may spark a conversation about hunger and sustainable food sources in Earth’s extreme environments, especially since hunger affects about 10% of the world’s population.

“The societal implications of everything we do in areas beyond national jurisdiction can no longer be ignored,” says Aganaba. “Advances in science and technology, without the potential to impact large and diverse users, lead to innovations that very few care about or benefit from and have no real value in advancing the common good.”

John Larsson, an associate research professor in ASU’s School of Sustainable Engineering and the Built Environment, will also provide support to advance education and outreach activities related to the project. One postdoctoral researcher, three graduate students and several undergraduate students from the three participating universities will participate in the Mars soil growth mission.

Meanwhile, Delgado says today that we work in a world where the future is now.

“I’ve been a science fiction fan all my life, and I think having been exposed to these stories has opened my mind to the work I do now,” she says. “I’m proud to work at a university like ASU that supports great thinkers and collaboration across disciplines and multiple institutions.”

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UN coordinator for grain deal says ‘food must flow’ as ships leave Ukrainian port https://offshores-nextdoor.com/un-coordinator-for-grain-deal-says-food-must-flow-as-ships-leave-ukrainian-port/ Mon, 31 Oct 2022 08:00:12 +0000 https://offshores-nextdoor.com/un-coordinator-for-grain-deal-says-food-must-flow-as-ships-leave-ukrainian-port/ The UN coordinator for the Black Sea Grain Initiative said on Monday that civilian cargo ships can never be a military target or held hostage, and that “food must flow” under the agreement whose Russia withdrew this weekend. Amir Abdulla’s Twitter comment came after the United Nations, Turkey and Ukraine set up a transit plan. […]]]>

The UN coordinator for the Black Sea Grain Initiative said on Monday that civilian cargo ships can never be a military target or held hostage, and that “food must flow” under the agreement whose Russia withdrew this weekend.

Amir Abdulla’s Twitter comment came after the United Nations, Turkey and Ukraine set up a transit plan.

For the latest headlines, follow our Google News channel online or through the app.

Meanwhile, on Monday, two cargo ships loaded with grain and other agricultural products left Ukrainian ports, according to a ship traffic website.

The ships, Admiral de Ribas and Mount Baker, left port days after Russia suspended its participation in a deal that allowed vital grain shipments to pass through the Black Sea.

Twelve ships were due to leave Ukrainian ports on Monday and four were due to head for the country, according to the Joint Coordination Center (JCC) which oversaw the deal brokered by Turkey and the UN.

Russia notified the UN and Turkey of its intention to suspend the deal indefinitely after Moscow accused Ukraine of a “massive” drone attack on its Black Sea Fleet in Crimea.

The July agreement to unblock grain exports signed between the warring nations of Russia and Ukraine is key to easing the global food crisis caused by the conflict.

The agreement, which established a safe corridor through which ships could travel to Istanbul for inspections, had already enabled the export of more than nine million tonnes of Ukrainian grain and was due to be renewed on November 19.

Read more:

Russia suspends role of grain ship inspector in Istanbul: JCC

Turkey says talks underway with Russia on status of Black Sea grains deal

EU urges Russia to resume role in Ukrainian grain export deal

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Fire breaks out at Food Corporation of India rice factory in Navi Mumbai https://offshores-nextdoor.com/fire-breaks-out-at-food-corporation-of-india-rice-factory-in-navi-mumbai/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 08:14:53 +0000 https://offshores-nextdoor.com/fire-breaks-out-at-food-corporation-of-india-rice-factory-in-navi-mumbai/ Bombay Live updates: A fire broke out at Food Corporation of India rice field in Kalamboli, Navi Mumbai on Tuesday morning. “We received a call about the fire around 7:04 a.m. 5 firefighters are on site. The fire has been brought under control,” said Saurabh Patil, fire chief of Kalamboli, quoted by the ANI news […]]]>

Bombay Live updates: A fire broke out at Food Corporation of India rice field in Kalamboli, Navi Mumbai on Tuesday morning. “We received a call about the fire around 7:04 a.m. 5 firefighters are on site. The fire has been brought under control,” said Saurabh Patil, fire chief of Kalamboli, quoted by the ANI news agency.

The BMC has planned a major beautification project for Dadar and Mahim, including the coastline between Dadar and Mahim Beach, Shivaji Park, Portuguese Church Junction and Dadar Railway Station. The BMC proposed to have a multimedia light show along Mahim and Dadar beaches and a digital aquarium inside the park opposite Chaityabhumi. It will offer tourists an experience of walking underground through a tunnel, with water and sea life above.

Separately, Maharashtra Deputy Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis said on Tuesday that the highly anticipated second Maharashtra cabinet expansion would take place soon and the final dates would be set in consultation with the Chief Minister Eknath Shinde.

Meanwhile, student organizations in Maharashtra are once again demanding to bring elections back to campuses, especially after the Tata Institute of Social Sciences (TISS) in Mumbai managed to organize a peaceful election last week. The request comes at a time when the University of Mumbai is in the process of reforming its executive bodies such as the senate, management and academic council.

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